music

Future of Music

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Event Link

Future of Music is an initiative created by future music industry professionals in Los Angeles. We provide opportunities to network and exchange ideas with music business students, artists, young industry professionals and whoever has passion for the music industry. We create new opportunities by connecting people from different background, while rooted in the center of the music industry.

The first Future of Music event kicks off this March with the discussion, "What Does It Mean to be an Artist in 2019," moderated by Anna Gandolfi, a graduate student from USC's Music Industry program. We will discuss the changed climate and recent news in the music industry in the perspective of the artists. Dr. Paul Young, a USC Thornton faculty member, will share his insights. Bring your thoughts to share as well as your business card.


Moderator
Anna Gandolfi


Performers
Antriksh Bali - Antriksh Bali’s work combines the gritty, industrial dark noises you would hear in a decrepit factory with the electronic experimentation and production values of a classical synth score you would hear in 1984. His work amalgamates the noisy nature of found sound, old recordings and sampling with roaring string sounds to create a unique, and exciting sonic universe.

Find out more about his work at www.antrikshbali.com

Tyler Alexis - Tyler Alexis is a singer/songwriter born and raised in beautiful, sunny California. She derives her music from a variety of influences, but focuses primarily on a fusion of alternative rock and folk styles. She has enjoyed the opportunity to collaborate and perform with artists around the globe. Most recently, Tyler released the music video for her single "I Miss You Tonight," directed by Aaron Kaiser, which can be found on YouTube, Vimeo, etc.

Follow her here: https://facebook.com/TylerAlexisMusic

Katie Greenberg
Katie Greenberg is an artist from the Chicago area and is new to the LA scene. Drawing inspiration from folk and Americana from the 60s and 70s as well as from popular music today, Katie strives to connect with audiences across genres and generations.

Find her by name on YouTube or on Instagram (@katiegreenberg).

A New Update

Many new incoming updates! Once again, it might seem that I have been inactive on the blogosphere owing to the constant back-and-forth I seem to be having with Weebly and certain issues that plague me. Honestly, giving a thought to moving over to Squarespace. More about that later (new alternative website in-the-works maybe?)

The past few months have seen me working on a wide variety of projects that to name a few, included writing music for a radio show, dabbling with 80s synthpop in this jam game for Ludum Dare Jam 35 and developing an audio demo for a new Serum sound-pack. There are of course many more projects in the works, and rest-assured I will get to speaking more about them as time progresses and more things come to light. In case you like podcasts and listening to them is your thing, don't forget to check out the recent podcasts by The State of Gaming where some of my music got used.

This post is mostly going to be talking about key highlights of my work in the past couple of months, we will get to the more interesting parts later. In case horror and horror literature is what fascinates you, there's also a short story I finally put out on my Wordpress page which complements the music recording I composed, conducted and produced for 51-piece orchestra last year. You could read more about the process and thinking that went behind it here on the blog itself.

I realise that the world is getting smaller and the ideas are getting bigger, causing changes bigger in scale than ever before in history. We're in a very interesting time in the course of civilisation. The internet is a powerful medium that has perhaps caused and triggered a lot of these changes. While there's a positive side to all of this, there's also a negative side. Security breaches, information leaks and 'encryption wars', the need for instant gratification, the rise of big data/its exploitation and of course the classic pet peeve - drastically reduced attention spans (Check out my Tumblr for more frequent posts if you need more updates regularly about the going-ons in my life)

Perhaps all of this has also had an impact on artists, thinkers and the creative community as a whole, which has given rise to alternative approaches to how content is produced, presented and distributed. Perhaps, greater change will come in this field in the few years to come. I would perhaps choose to embrace change rather than stay routed in 'the old way' and how things were done before. As an artist, you either change with the times or you disappear. Talking about changes and how much they matter for the future, I'll sign off urging you to go sign this petition as I believe it's important for the future of music and it's fair use.

Elementary Mathematics

It's been a couple of months since I last posted here. There are a large number of reasons that has been the case. Some of them, you might find out soon, while others not. Having moved to Los Angeles about a month ago, I have been exploring avenues and possible paths of a future career in music technology or video games or interactive media or if possible, all three. I recently started doing an internship in Sound Design at Native Instruments and it has been quite the wonderful journey so far, full of broad learning curves, dynamically shifting perspective and one filled with opening up of new horizons for me.

Having just concluded with my master's course at Berklee Valencia in film scoring, Most people would call it a drastic jump to shift into a music technology company. I wouldn't call it so, primarily because in some ways, I always felt affinity towards music technology and how it fuels creativity was always a part of how I think about music. Even though I may or may not see myself composing and creating music in the more traditional vein music composers and orchestrators usually approach such fields, I believe that at heart if you've ever been a creator, you always stay one.

Methods change, approaches differ. There is conflict in how you perceive art and music with perhaps someone else, but I believe that's the beauty of art, music and life in general. Harmony in dissonance. Often walking down the street at Hollywood Boulevard on a warm weekday morning, I hear the distant honk of a car or the morning chatter of high school kids discussing there weekend adventures. and I tell myself 'ah, that sounds like music'. How, you may ask. If you're reading, you may already know the answer.

We all maybe artists, or accountants. Engineers or software whiz-kids. But in certain ways, we're all echoing off each other. Some artists, take what they have - the raw material. Throw it down on a canvas. Jumbled colours, an abstract idea. Software engineers? They use native data types and already existing functions to shape their ideas. Not sounding that different any more, I hope?

A flash of an idea late at night, or a sudden spark at lunch. That's usually how it always begins. A grand idea for the next path-breaking album or the next software revolution that could shift perceptions. We're all curators. Taking the idea off that graffiti wall we saw on our way to work or maybe using that flute solo we heard on an old Indian devotional song. You never know where it's gonna come from. And that excitement about the creative process is what always excites me. The inspiration, the journey. Rather than just the destination.

But that might not be what this blog post maybe about. It's about something a bit more subtle and something a lot less prominent in the normal daily life of an individual. Elementary mathematics. Technological process has been steady and slowly accelerating. A lot more in the last twenty years than the last hundred. But do we really see the process? How a new computer has seemingly faster speeds and more memory than the last one? What could have possibly made that a reality? Of course it's all coming out of mathematics. The universe creates problems and barriers, and creators find clever ways around it.

I have found myself wondering more and more about the mathematical nature of problems and how their solutions can sometimes seem to be counter-intuitive at first, but as the solution is developed in parts, the way the parts are then later combined to interact with each other can also prove to be quite mind-boggling. I would call it much like playing a game of chess. You might have absolutely no idea what's going to happen five moves later, but you make your best move and adapt your solution as the pieces change. It's all very dynamic and unpredictable. This brings me to the idea that perhaps programmatically devising and creating music as solutions to particular mathematical problems could bring about interesting kinds of musical experiences to the forefront. Perhaps, it's already being done as I write this.