acoustic

Looking to The Skies

Ever since the dawn of mankind, man has been looking up to the skies for everything ranging from inspiration and direction to meditation and as part and parcel of a sense of curiosity. I tend to think it is ingrained somewhere deep in the very fabric of us all. To look at something deeper and much more larger than us and feel content with the mysteries of the universe.

It's with a similar feeling I started working on another track with friend and collaborator Aishwarya. It started once again, the usual way. I played a piano rhythm track on top of an electronic beat and sent it to him. What he created on top of that was pretty huge. He sent me back about 40 stems if I remember correctly, and it was absolutely mental going through all of them.

What I love about collaborating with other musicians is the fact that sometimes you create something that you feels vibrates from the essence of your being, and they will take it and make it their own instead. It's exchange of ideas that goes way beyond all the artificial ties and friendships we all have. It's something so untainted, so true. The fact that it exists is what makes you want to go on making music. It's the feeling you live for, as a musician.

As days and weeks passed by, I slowly ploughed through each one of them, EQ'ing, mixing and compressing them, shaping and moulding what the building blocks of the track were. Lots of times, some things wouldn't fit the way he arranged it so I would flip it around, add a couple of effects and try something new. It's always good to progress and evolve. That's what music is for me, a whirlwind of constant change.

Ultimately after about a couple of months, and some added feedback by Uniyal, I put this track up on Soundcloud. And I realised there was something very spacey and other-worldly about this track. That feeling of being a kid and having an entire universe in front of you to explore and discover, that's the feeling I wanted to convey.

One doesn't have to always get old. You just have to stay true to your heart.

Time to watch a movie. About aliens.

 
 

Influences : The Good and The Ugly

I have realised there have been quite a few influences that have shaped and changed how I approach making music for a film. Yesterday night while I was going through the usual sources to get my hands on new music, I came across a playlist on a website 8tracks. It had this playlist with really old creepy folk songs. 

There was this one song that stood out from that playlist, in particular that used a lot of harpsichord and there was this drone in the background whose pitch kept bending up and down. I never quite managed to find that song, but I thought it really did a good job of creating an eerie ambience.

Below: A similar mix to the one I heard on 8tracks to give me inspiration. It has a doomy folk feeling to it.

 

I set out to make something similar as a skeleton for a dreamy sequence about a bathroom in the movie I was working on. An important aspect when you're working on music for a film is the fact that it's not just about music or ambience, it's the sound as well. For example, I made it a point to incorporate the sound of tap water or maybe just water pouring down on a floor, so that the person listening/watching the film can actually relate it to. Sometimes it's all about the realism.

The track ended up sounding quite creepy and dissonant as well. I took some white noise, processed it and EQ'd it a bit and used it as a snare, It was quite an interesting thing to do, because it interacted so well with the rest of the track, I decided to keep it. I also decided to deliberately incorporate some vinyl crackles just to add a little dirt. Dirty is good, sometimes.

 
 

 

'Don't Be Afraid of The Dark', a horror movie released back in 1973 served as one of the inspirations for the movie score I was working on.

Another cool thing that I tried doing was I really turned down the kick a few notches, so there were times when all you could hear was the snare which created interesting audio illusions that there was a kick when actually there wouldn't be one at places.

I've also been using a lot of Reason to create soundscapes and ambient layers for this score in particular, and I think it sort of, shows that all those sounds were quite experimental, when you listen to them.

And I'm off to a break now.